Information

About Us

Miami Senior One Squadron, is one of several squadrons serving under the command Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol.  As a senior squadron, the unit's membership consist of senior members (18 years old and older).  This squadron performs the tactical application of two of Civil Air Patrol's Congressionally mandated missions:  Aerospace Education and Emergency Services.
 
If you wish to join this unit, begin by clicking here:
More

Our Mission

Following World War Two, the role of the Civil Air Patrol in servitude to its citizens needed redefining.  On May 26, 1948 the 80th Congress passed Public Law 80-557 permanently establishing the Civil Air Patrol as the auxiliary of the newly established U.S. Air Force.  

Aerospace Education

Aerospace EducationCAP's aerospace education efforts focus on two different audiences: volunteer CAP members and the general public.  The programs ensure that all CAP members (seniors and cadets) have an appreciation for and knowledge of aerospace issues.  To advance within the organization, members are required to participate in the educational program.  Aerospace educators at CAP's National Headquarters at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala., provide current materials that reflect the highest standards of educational excellence.  Aerospace education is divided into two parts: internal and external.         
The internal aerospace education program has two parts as well: cadet and senior. Cadets complete aerospace education as one of the requirements to progress through the  achievement levels of the cadet program. Senior members have a responsibility to become knowledgeable of aerospace issues and the AE program that CAP provides. They are further encouraged to share the information obtained with their local communities and school systems.                                
CAP's external aerospace programs are conducted through our nation's educational system.  Each year, CAP sponsors many workshops in states across the nation, reaching hundreds of educators and thereby thousands of young people.  These workshops highlight basic aerospace knowledge and focus on advances in aerospace technology.  CAP's aerospace education members receive more than 20 free aerospace education classroom materials. 
To learn more about CAP's aerospace education programs, products, and other resources available to our members, go to www.capmembers.com/ae.  For information about joining as an aerospace education member (AEM) and to join online, go to www.capmembers.com/joinaem.  

Cadet Programs

Cadet ProgramWhile there are many youth oriented programs in America today, CAP's cadet program is unique in that it uses aviation as a cornerstone.  Thousands of young people from 12 years through age 21 are introduced to aviation through CAP's cadet program.  The program allows young people to progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership training, physical fitness and moral leadership.  Cadets compete for academic scholarships to further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace medicine, meteorology, as well as many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic). 
 
Whatever your interests-survival training, flight training, photography, astronomy-there's a place for you in CAP's cadet program.  Each year, cadets have the opportunity  to participate in special activities at the local, state, regional or national level.  Many cadets will have the opportunity to solo fly an airplane for the first time through a flight encampment or academy.  Others will enjoy traveling abroad through the International Air Cadet Exchange Program. Still others assist at major air shows throughout the nation.

Emergency Services

Emergency Services ProgramGrowing from its World War II experience, the Civil Air Patrol has continued to save lives and alleviate human suffering through a myriad of emergency-services and operational missions.

Search and Rescue                               
Perhaps best known for its search-and-rescue efforts, CAP flies more than 85 percent of all federal inland search-and-rescue missions directed by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fl. Outside the continental United States, CAP supports the Joint Rescue Coordination Centers in Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Just how effective are the CAP missions? Nearly 100 people are saved each year by CAP members.

Disaster Relief                                
Another important service CAP performs is disaster-relief operations. CAP provides air and ground transportation and an extensive communications network. Volunteer members fly disaster-relief officials to remote locations and provide manpower and leadership to local, state and national disaster-relief organizations. CAP has formal agreements with many government and humanitarian relief agencies including the American Red Cross, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Aviation Administration, National Transportation Safety Board and the U.S. Coast Guard.

Humanitarian Services                            
CAP flies humanitarian missions, usually in support of the Red Cross-transporting time-sensitive medical materials including blood and human tissue, in situations where other means of transportation are not available.

Air Force Support                            
It's hardly surprising that CAP performs several missions in direct support of the U.S. Air Force. Specifically, CAP conducts light transport, communications support, and low-altitude route surveys. CAP also provides orientation flights for AFROTC cadets. Joint U.S. Air Force and CAP search-and-rescue exercises provide realistic training for missions. 

Counterdrug
CAP joined the "war on drugs" in 1986 when, pursuant to congressional authorization, CAP signed an agreement with the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Customs Service offering CAP resources to help stem the flow of drugs into and within the United States.
More

Flying with the CAP

CAP aircrews hone excellent piloting skills through numerous missions. Over the years, CAP aircrews have provided assistance to numerous boaters in need. In addition, the squadron is tasked by the U. S. Air Force and other agencies for special missions. Other emergency services missions can include transporting medical technicians, lifesaving medicines and human organs for transplant. When disaster strikes, such as a hurricane, CAP provides emergency communication systems and gathers vital information for emergency management through aerial and ground reconnaissance. 
The Civil Air Patrol offers many opportunities for volunteer service. There are numerous roles which initially require minimal or no prior experience. We provide training to develop skills for important roles of mission base staff, ground team, and aircrew. Some of the critical positions you can fill include: 

Mission Radio Operator (MRO) – A ground based position which involves communication with the airplane while in flight or other CAP radio stations. Requires Aircrewbasic ES qualification.

Mission Scanner (MS) – An introductory but important flight crew position, where the Scanner sits in the back seat during missions and scans the ground looking for targets. Requires basic ES qualification.

Mission Observer (MO) – An advanced aircrew position which requires significant aeronautical knowledge and ability to operate the radios and navigational equipment, in order to assist the pilot. Requires Mission Scanner qualification.

Mission Pilot (MP) – The Pilot in Command (PIC) for all missions. Requires Mission Scanner qualification, Form 5 checkride, Form 91 checkride, etc. (see separate document on how to become a CAP pilot)

CAP CessnaThe squadron provides training for all of the above positions. Cadets are eligible for basic flight training, CAP does not provide basic pilot training for senior members. It is the personal responsibility of all CAP pilots to meet FAA requirements for currency in light planes including bi-annual flight review and medical certificate, and to meet the Private Pilot Practical Test Standards.

CAP Pilots have access to CAP airplanes for use to maintain currency of pilot qualifications. The personal expense incurred for using CAP aircraft is minimal, less than half of the typical hourly rental rate for a similar type of aircraft. The PIC is responsible for paying for the cost of the airplane. These cost may vary depending on Florida Wing charges and gasoline costs. Check with the unit’s Operations Officer for the latest rate. The airplane cost may be waived by the Air Force for actual missions, or by a Flight Release Officer.

Are You a Pilot?


If you’re a pilot, CAP has plenty of opportunities for you. CAP owns the largest fleet of single-engine piston aircraft in the nation, primarily Cessna 172s and 182s, and CAP pilots are able to fly those planes to perform CAP missions in service to their local communities. You can find the full list of requirements to fly for CAP Civil Air Patrol Airvanunder our Pilot FAQs.

CAP pilots fly reconnaissance missions for homeland security, search and rescue, disaster relief, and even counterdrug operations at the request of government or law enforcement agencies. They sometimes transport medical personnel and supplies and blood and live tissue. In times of disaster, they assess damage and transport emergency personnel from site to site. When not flying traditional emergency missions, cadet orientation pilots fly orientation rides for cadets and teachers while also maintaining their own proficiency.

AircrewThe Civil Air Patrol’s aircraft are located at strategic locations throughout the nation to be readily available when missions arise. CAP members maintain these aircraft at the highest levels of safety and efficiency and have access to specialists at CAP National headquarters for maintenance, safety and training questions.

As a CAP pilot, you perform some of the organizations’ most important work. CAP is also a great place for you to meet and work with people who share your interest in flying and want to use their skills in a meaningful way.
More

History of the CAP

Civil Air Patrol - The Beginning

Pearl Harbor propelled the United States into World War II, but many Americans saw the AXIS threat long before Dec. 7, 1941. Among them were nearly 150,000 men and women involved in aviation.

Coastal PatrolAs early as 1938, they began to argue for the creation of an organization to harness their aviation resources to aid the nation in the event America entered the conflict. Their efforts, led by writer-aviator Gill Robb Wilson and supported by Gen. Henry "Hap" Arnold, resulted in the creation of the Civil Air Patrol on Dec. 1, 1941 - one week before Pearl Harbor.

First organized under the Office of Civilian Defense, headed by former New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, Civil Air Patrol members became the "Minutemen" of World War II, volunteering their time, resources, and talents to defend the nation's borders and fill the gaps as men and resources were being mobilized to fight abroad.

The War Department, especially the Army Air Forces, recognized the important roles performed by CAP. In April 1943, CAP was reassigned from the Office of Civilian Defense to the War Department and placed under the jurisdiction of the Army Air Forces.
 

Coastal Patrol"After the German surrender, one of Hitler's high-ranking naval officers was asked why the Nazi U-boats had been withdrawn from U.S. coastal waters early in 1943. The answer was exploded in a curt guttural: 'It was because of those damned little red and yellow planes!'"

-- From Robert E. Neprud's Flying Minute Men


 
These Flying Minutemen, all volunteers, performed valiantly during the war. They performed many missions including coastal patrol to search for enemy submarines, search and rescue missions throughout the United States, cargo and courier flights to transfer critical materials and personnel, and even towing targets so Army Air Corps personnel could practice air-to-air gunnery techniques - a very risky mission with new gunners.Radio Communications

In all, these volunteers amassed a stunning record - flying more than half-a-million hours, sinking two enemy submarines, and saving hundreds of crash victims.

A thankful nation recognized the vital role CAP played during the war and understood the organization could continue to provide invaluable help to both local and national agencies.

On July 1, 1946, President Harry Truman signed Public Law 476 that incorporated CAP as a benevolent, nonprofit organization.
 
More

Photos

Squadron Photos available on Facebook. Please click below to be redirected to the Facebook page. 
More


 
divider